AZ Citizens Clean Elections Commission Approves Candidate for Governor's Digital Qualifying Process

AZ Citizens Clean Elections Commission Approves Candidate for Governor's Digital Qualifying Process

AZ Citizens Clean Elections Commission Approves Candidate for Governor's Digital Qualifying Process

 

For the first time in Arizona history, a campaign has received approval from the Arizona Citizens' Clean Elections Commission to use an internet-based process, independent of the Secretary of State’s website, to collect and verify the $5 qualifying contributions required to participate in the program.


Until now, the only way to contribute online was to first provide the voter's driver's license number and date of birth on the Secretary of State's website. The new process created by Kevin McCormick's campaign for governor verifies with an electronic signature via DocuSign.


McCormick said, “In the past, it was impossible for citizens to compete with dark money in Arizona. The Clean Elections program was created by voters to keep the state from being sold to special interest groups, and as governor, I'll continue to create solutions that represent only the people of Arizona."


Campaign Manager Jenn Gray said, “This is a major victory for all Arizona voters, candidates, and the Clean Elections program.” Communications Director Jason Tucker added, “We were informed by many individuals that they were unable to complete the donation process using the Secretary of State's website. We met with representatives from both the Secretary of State and the Clean Elections Commission, and we were able to create a better process for all parties involved.”


Clean Elections has been a two-party slush fund for years -- and now Republicans in particular are getting nervous. The Legislature responded to the possibility of an electronic signature with a new measure putting Ducey appointees in charge of what's supposed to be an independent Commission. This is exactly the type of corruption Arizona voters were trying to prevent when they overwhelmingly approved the Clean Elections Act in 1998.


"Republicans can't handle that we're holding them accountable for broken promises not to raise taxes, and private prison quota deals with the corporations who fund their campaigns," McCormick added. If he obtains 4,000 $5 donations from registered Arizona voters, the Clean Elections Commission will fund the campaign, making it the largest third-party race in the country in 2018.

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  • Jennifer Gray
    published this page in News 2018-05-09 17:28:49 -0700